Through the Looking-glass (Fully Illustrated)

Through the Looking-glass (Fully Illustrated)

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-Illustrated with the the fifty original illustrations by John Tenniel. -Table of contents to every chapters in the book. -Complete and formatted for kindle to improve your reading experience Alice is playing with a white kitten (whom she calls qSnowdropq) and a black kitten (whom she calls qKittyq)a€”the offspring of Dinah, Alice's cat in Alice's Adventures in Wonderlanda€”when she ponders what the world is like on the other side of a mirror's reflection. Climbing up on the fireplace mantel, she pokes at the wall-hung mirror behind the fireplace and discovers, to her surprise, that she is able to step through it to an alternative world. In this reflected version of her own house, she finds a book with looking-glass poetry, qJabberwockyq, whose reversed printing she can read only by holding it up to the mirror. She also observes that the chess pieces have come to life, though they remain small enough for her to pick up. Upon leaving the house (where it had been a cold, snowy night), she enters a sunny spring garden where the flowers have the power of human speech; they perceive Alice as being a qflower that can move about.q Elsewhere in the garden, Alice meets the Red Queen, who is now human-sized, and who impresses Alice with her ability to run at breathtaking speeds. This is a reference to the chess rule that queens are able to move any number of vacant squares at once, in any direction, which makes them the most qagileq of pieces. The Red Queen reveals to Alice that the entire countryside is laid out in squares, like a gigantic chessboard, and offers to make Alice a queen if she can move all the way to the eighth rank/row in a chess match. This is a reference to the chess rule of Promotion. Alice is placed in the second rank as one of the White Queen's pawns, and begins her journey across the chessboard by boarding a train that literally jumps over the third row and directly into the fourth rank, thus acting on the rule that pawns can advance two spaces on their first move. Tenniel illustration of Tweedledum (centre) and Tweedledee (right) and Alice (left). 1871) Red King snoring, by John Tenniel She then meets the fat twin brothers Tweedledum and Tweedledee, whom she knows from the famous nursery rhyme. After reciting the long poem qThe Walrus and the Carpenterq, the Tweedles draw Alice's attention to the Red Kinga€”loudly snoring away under a nearby treea€”and maliciously provoke her with idle philosophical banter that she exists only as an imaginary figure in the Red King's dreams (thereby implying that she will cease to exist the instant he wakes up). Finally, the brothers begin acting out their nursery-rhyme by suiting up for battle, only to be frightened away by an enormous crow, as the nursery rhyme about them predicts. Alice next meets the White Queen, who is very absent-minded but boasts of (and demonstrates) her ability to remember future events before they have happened. Alice and the White Queen advance into the chessboard's fifth rank by crossing over a brook together, but at the very moment of the crossing, the Queen transforms into a talking Sheep in a small shop. Alice soon finds herself struggling to handle the oars of a small rowboat, where the Sheep annoys her with (seemingly) nonsensical shouting about qcrabsq and qfeathersq. Unknown to Alice, these are standard terms in the jargon of rowing. Thus (for a change) the Queen/Sheep was speaking in a perfectly logical and meaningful way. After crossing yet another brook into the sixth rank, Alice immediately encounters Humpty Dumpty, who, besides celebrating his unbirthday, provides his own translation of the strange terms in qJabberwockyq. In the process, he introduces Alice (and the reader) to the concept of portmanteau words, before his inevitable fall.This is a reference to the chess rule that queens are able to move any number of vacant squares at once, in any direction, which makes them the most aquot;agileaquot; of pieces.


Title:Through the Looking-glass (Fully Illustrated)
Author: Lewis Carroll
Publisher:LCI -
ISBN-13:

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